FINDING MONEY FOR A COLLEGE EDUCATION

Getting a college education is becoming more and more expensive to the extent that it is becoming extremely difficult for a person of modest means to go to college. Trying to work while one goes to college can be frustrating because the amount of money one can earn at a part or full time job is rarely enough to pay for housing, plus tuition, books and other fees. There are many resources either on line or available at a local college or university. At the university I attended, there was an extensive library devoted to scholarships, grants, writing proposals and so on. I discovered this library when I went there not as a student but as a professional writing a proposal for a research grant. Here are some of the categories I found:

1. Scholarships and grants for students whose parents lived in a particular community and worked for a specific company or had a specific occupation are available. The category of scholarships and grants is particularly useful because, unlike loans, they do not have to be paid back. Many students have no idea that these kind of scholarships and grants exist.
2. Work Study is often offered by Community Colleges, Four Year Colleges, and Universities can be combined with grants, loans, and scholarships to provided the student with some extra spending money. Some colleges and universities have learning centers where students can go to get help in study skills, writing skills and topics in mathematics, science, and other technical areas where they need help. Let us say for example that you have good writing skills. If you have the time and patience to work with other students, you can get paid to help other students. There is another advantage of working in a learning center and that is that in teaching others you will enhance your own learning because students will ask you questions that you never thought of because the particular subject was easy for you to learn.
3. Loans are another way to get through college which is an advantage, but loans do have to be paid back and usually have to be guaranteed by your parents unless you are independent and self employed.
4. What ever choice is open to you, you need to get started early and start before you graduate from high school if you are still in high school. The internet is a good place to start, but you do not have to pay someone to apply for a grant, scholarship, or loan. You will need to to have financial information from your parents or from your own income statement.
5. Make absolutely certain that you check your spelling and sentence structure when you apply for admission to a college or university. There is nothing worse than to project yourself as lacking in skills. Remember you are trying to sell yourself to a committee who does not know you. Have someone else check your work and chose someone who you know has good writing skills.
6. Finally, you have to choose a specific set of schools that fit you as a person. For the first two years, a community college is a good choice because not everyone has to go to an Ivy League College or University such as Harvard or Princeton. Luckily for myself, I chose to go to a small four year college which had a good faculty and a small student body whose back ground fit my own. I went to this college with the attitude that I was going there to learn and not to party. Learning should be approached as a job